Mayor Unveils Revitalization Budget Proposal

At a press conference today at Westwood Town Hall, Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley announced his plans for a budget proposal for neighborhood revitalization, noting that public safety is enhanced by robust economic development. Among the $10M in projects the Mayor announced this morning are significant enhancements to Westwood’s Town Hall Park and the expansion of Gaines Memorial Triangle at the intersection of Harrison, Epworth, and Urwiler Aves, an allocation of $4M.  This project is part of the Westwood Coalition’s recommendations for the revitalization of the historic neighborhood business district and supported by Westwood Civic Association, Westwood Historical Society, WestCURC, and Westwood Works.

Joining Mayor Cranley at the press conference were Vice Mayor David Mann and Councilmember P. G. Sittenfeld who both spoke in favor of the budget proposal. Mayor Cranley commented on the deep community engagement in Westwood, led by the Coalition, and similar efforts in West Price Hill and College Hill. He noted that councilmembers campaigned on the notion of putting money back into and strengthening neighborhoods and that this commitment will make good on those promises. The revitalization planning process in Westwood started in earnest more than five years ago, on the shoulders of years of work by individual organizations. In fact, Councilmember Christopher Smitherman urged community organizations to work cooperatively on redevelopment initiatives, resulting in formation of the Coalition. Calling attention to the deep, sustained neighborhood efforts, Mayor Cranley commented today that,

“The vast majority of these projects have been on the planning table for a long time, but they lacked resources to get them done.”

The Westwood Coalition recently hosted a session with Parks officials and MKSK, the landscape architecture firm developing the plans. Conceptual drawings and notes are posted here. Public comments are welcome and another public session will be offered as plans continue to take shape.

For more on today’s announcements, see coverage in the media, including Cranley calls for $10 million in neighborhood boosts (Fox 19), Morning news and stuff (City Beat), Mayor Rolls Out First Of Several Changes To Proposed Cincinnati Budget (WVXU), and Some Cincinnati neighborhoods could get big boost under mayor’s budget plan (WCPO).

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“Puppet Theater Brings Change to Westwood”

In an article highlighting fundraising and other developments at Madcap Puppets in Westwood, the author notes that Madcap has raised the majority of the $2M in its capital campaign for the renovation of the former Bell building as its new site, destined to bring 40,000+ people to Westwood’s historic neighborhood business district each year — and why we referred to Madcap as catalyst for revitalization in recent posts.

Madcap works extensively with the Westwood Coalition, a group dedicated to revitalizing the neighborhood, and is active in developing the plans for the revitalization of a new business district and town square.

From CityBeat,Puppet Theater Brings Change to Westwood, April 23, 2014

New code prohibits bad development

Any zoning code (form-based or conventional) has restrictions of Use that must be fair and legal. For example, it is not legal to allow some retail uses while not allowing others. If a community wants to allow high-end retailers in its business district, its code must also allow second-tier retailers. What a form-based code does, that conventional codes usually do not do, is set restrictions based on form, building type and frontage type (such as building placement, front door placement, storefront requirements, etc.). It was these requirements – embedded in Cincinnati’s form-based code – that kept a poorly designed, second-tier, discount store from moving into one of Cincinnati’s neighborhoods recently.

Bad development that has occurred in some of Cincinnati’s neighborhoods in the past is now prohibited under the new form-based code. We have too many neighborhood business districts where the “front” of a building was built as a windowless concrete block wall or where a building was set back from the street by a quarter acre of asphalt parking. These developments have a detrimental impact on the welfare of the neighborhood – not because of the uses within them but because of the form the buildings took.

Jeff Raser, principal, Glaserworks Architecture & Urban Design
on cincinnati.com
Read the full article at http://www.cincinnati.com/story/opinion/contributors/2014/04/04/new-code-prohibits-bad-development/7331569/