Report and Recommendations Regarding a Westwood Square

The Westwood Coalition has issued its report and recommendations regarding a Westwood square. As the report notes, “[t]his report summarizes the Coalition’s community-focused review process and feasibility study devoted to the concept of a “Westwood Square” and makes recommendations based on input received. The Coalition, as part of its outreach, worked closely with representatives of the City’s Transportation and Engineering Department to examine a number of potential options for a Westwood Square for presentation to neighborhood organizations, businesses, and residents. Options in conceptual form were developed by City staff, with consideration for traffic, safety, function, and general feasibility. The Coalition then coordinated a series of public meetings in Westwood, with representatives of the City’s Transportation and Engineering Department in attendance, along with other City staff and outside development experts. The purpose of the meetings in Westwood was to gain insight into residents’ opinions, on which this report’s recommendations are based.”

The recommendations are made to the four organizations that have representatives to the Coalition. Once those organizations respond, the Coalition will share the responses and next steps, which will include a formal set of recommendations to City officials.

Which option or variation is recommended, you ask? It’s the Triangle option, for a number of reasons, detailed in the Coalition’s report and recommendations. It’s important to emphasize, though, that the recommendations include corollary and complimentary development along Harrison Avenue throughout the neighborhood’s historic business district and on the grounds of Westwood Town Hall. We hope that you will read the full report for the context and the details. (It’s only four pages long.) Please offer any comments here or via revitalizewestwood@gmail.com or to any of the four organizations.

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Westwood Square Meeting Notes

Mary Jenkins, Westwood Coalition facilitator and representative of Westwood Civic Association to the Coalition, welcomed attendees, numbering over 110 people. She introduced Coalition members, thanked staff from the Westwood School, and covered housekeeping items. Ms. Jenkins described the meeting as a presentation to be followed by community input, focused wholly on the Westwood Square concept. Next, she reviewed the origin of the Westwood Square: an idea generated originally through community engagement in design charrettes following identification of neighborhood business district (NBD) strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. The City allocated $10,000 for a Department of Transportation and Engineering (DOTE) feasibility study. The design charrettes identified criteria for a Square which were validated through the Westwood Coalition’ community meetings over the past year. The June 12 meeting was an opportunity for DOTE staff and the Westwood Coalition to report on the study and invite community response.

Ms. Jenkins then described the intent for the evening: a DOTE-led look at six options, including no build and the original conceptual drawing shown in the media, followed by an assessment by residents of each of the options, based on identified criteria. She made several points before launching into a review of the criteria:
• Parking: None of the options would resolve the perceived parking shortage in and of itself. Parking will be addressed as part of an emerging multi-faceted plan for the NBD.
• Property: Neither the City nor the Coalition is promoting or planning to take property by eminent domain. Businesses in our NBD are treasures and people’s livelihood. The discussion about the Square is a consideration of future conditions and opportunities for the neighborhood and its businesses.
• Process: Westwood residents are driving the conversation. The City is contributing professional expertise. Residents are contributing knowledge and passion.

Ms. Jenkins briefly highlighted the conditions that the community is seeking to improve, and the desired attributes, in the NBD and specifically at the intersection of its Main + Main, or the heart of the NBD. These issues have been discussed and affirmed in various meetings and in the Coalition’s report in fall 2013.

Concerns
• Parking
• Public Safety
• A need for businesses more suited to the community’s preferences and needs
• Low business retention and vacant storefronts
• Limited places to socialize like restaurants, coffee shops and pubs
• Traffic volumes and speed

Desired Attributes
• A walkable, attractive business district
• Retail stores that offer a variety of consumer products and services with some emphasis on regional or independent shops
• A public or civic or green space
• The availability of nearby parking
• A number of options for casual and more elegant dining

Next up: Martha Kelly and Jeff Stine of Cincinnati DOTE co-presented on the six options considered during DOTE’s feasibility study which considered not only the viability of the conceptual drawing that has been in the news, but also several other possibilities given the opportunities and challenges of the NBD’s traffic and street configuration:

Ms. Kelly walked attendees through the criteria, detailed on the accompanying presentation. They include Safety, Neighborhood Quality, Economic Impact, Schedule/Coordination, and Cost. Each criterion has a number of components; for example, safety involves vehicular and pedestrian safety and other factors. Ms. Kelly explained that personal safety includes reducing places where a person might hide as well as crossing safety. She noted that the ability to get around the NBD includes bicyclists, pedestrians, drivers, and includes not only convenience but also reduced confusion.

Next, Ms. Kelly remarked that the creation of space should be considered in terms of its utility – whether usable, programmable space or simply green space, noting that individuals will have their own sense of preference based on perception of what benefit the space brings and how it might be maintained. In commenting on economic impact, Ms. Kelly pointed out that revitalization requires the community to ask if the investment in the Square creates conditions for economic sustainability. Commenting on parking, Ms. Kelly noted that some of the options make space for on-street parking but there should be opportunities for off-site parking as well, as demonstrated by some of the options. She cited traffic flow that is relatively light along Harrison as compared to ten years ago.

In terms of the construction process, Ms. Kelly commented that DOTE considers schedule, coordination, and cost, not among the criteria for the June 12 meeting. Some costs of a square such as this, like lighting and green space maintenance or programming, continue on beyond the life of the project itself, and are costs sometimes borne by business owners and local organizations. She noted that construction in phases is often possible and, depending on the project, can have short- and long-term impacts and benefits.

Before reviewing each option, Ms. Kelly noted that DOTE is open to variations and ideas and asked that comments come through the Westwood Coalition at revitalizewestwood@gmail.com or on its website. She commented that the $10,000 feasibility study funds are spent, but that DOTE could consider some changes to the maps and can address questions.

Please note that these descriptions are best viewed along with the images, and their context, in the presentation at https://revitalizewestwood.files.wordpress.com/2014/06/westwood-square-june-12-2014.pdf.

OPTION 1: No Build
As its name suggests, the No Build option involves no major reworking of intersections or traffic. However, this option could still create more welcoming gateways at either end of the NBD (like Montana & Harrison and Boudinot & Harrison) and make some modest improvements to the Main + Main at Harrison / Urwiler / Epworth. Further, there are opportunities for streetscaping, individual business or property improvements, signage coordination, lighting enhancements, bollards, and cooperative planning and cohesiveness. She noted the current long pedestrian crossings, pedestrian and traffic confusion, and sharp lefts at this intersection.

OPTION 2: The Original Small Square
Option 2 is the conceptual drawing that has appeared in the media and on the Coalition’s website. Depicted now in the slides to scale, it is 42’Wx144’L. It is surrounded by pavers and a 6’ sidewalk and includes a 22’x124’ grassy area. It meets the requirement of green space and might be landscaped or hardscaped but its year-round use should be considered. In the original drawing, on-street parking was shown, which would not be possible with turning angles for trucks. There could be confusion with close intersections and a mid-way pedestrian crossing would be needed. New development opportunities would exist between Henke Winery and the Square, with space facing the Square and a nice view pattern to the landmarks in the vicinity.

OPTION 3: The Large Square
This option includes a 148’ square. The intersection is smaller. It would require some building acquisition on both sides. There are opportunities for small development. It maintains the focus on the Main + Main. The space is sufficiently large as to suggest opportunities for programming the space, whether businesses or a center of community activity. It simplifies the intersection and maintains much of the area around the Square. The gateways to the NBD support this Square as its center. It reinforces the residential feel around the Square and creates an improved flow for traffic through the area.

OPTION 4: The Triangle/Bowtie/Mirror
This option would require acquisition of the old service station at the intersection. It would work well in tandem with a redeveloped performance space on the end of the Town Hall grounds. It creates a powerful presence. One of the spaces could be hardscaped while the other could be landscaped or green space. It ties the two spaces together and creates opportunities for programming and development. It would involve closing off Urwiler. Parking would be gained and additional parking will help to slow down traffic and aid in street calming. There are significant opportunities for the interaction of businesses with the space. Crosswalks would be simpler and could allow for alternating times for pedestrian and vehicular traffic.

OPTION 5: Central Harrison Square
This option creates a square such as the ones in Oakley or Hyde Park. Two paver areas would be flush with the street and the center space measures 60’Wx232’L, creating 13,204 sq. ft. There are significant development options and landscaping opportunities. Existing buildings along both sides of Harrison would be demolished under this option, creating new development area. It is the equivalent of four Bell (Madcap) buildings on one side and seven on the other, to give a sense of scale. Outdoor seating, cafes, and more are possible. It would impact residential properties as well, to create traffic flow and parking. Elder Alley would be vacated. The intersection is substantially improved and travel around the Square is reasonable. Angled parking would require even more space; this image depicts parallel parking.

OPTION 6: Town Hall Rotary
This option makes Town Hall the focal point, rather than the identified Main+Main. It creates a traffic flow via a rotary around Town Hall and highlights green space as the programmable area. Parking could be removed from the Town Hall grounds, moving it along the street. It is 2.4 acres, or 100,000 sq. ft. Development opportunities exist at the historic firehouse and some surrounding residential and commercial areas. Additional work would be possible at the Harrison/Urwiler/Epworth intersection. The main feature to consider is traffic flow from Montana. This option requires a one way rotary around Town Hall. It creates some concerns about traffic weaving as a driver enters the rotary from one point and wants to exit the rotary on the opposite side.

The six criteria used by attendees on June 12 are a condensing of the more extensive criteria shown in the accompanying presentation. They do not include cost or construction factors.

Criteria
1. Reduce speed / calm traffic while accommodating traffic
2. Define the neighborhood center, sense of place, usable civic space
3. Increase green space
4. Improve intersection safety
5. Improve pedestrian safety / connectivity
6. Foster economic development, provide business development potential

Attendees then went into the foyer and reviewed the six images, talking with friends and neighbors and asking follow up questions. Each person received 36 dots to apply to charts listing each option and the six criteria under consideration. Details of that process and the distribution of dots and comments will be added to this site this week.

Options for Westwood Square: Feasibility Study

Here is the presentation (link below) from the June 12 Westwood Coalition’s community meeting about the Westwood Square. Notes to follow. The presentation is a report by Cincinnati’s Department of Transportation & Engineering on its Westwood Square feasibility study. It was prepared and presented by Martha Kelly and Jeff Stine of DOTE. Initial slides about the process preceding the June 12 meeting and the community’s criteria were presented by the Coalition.

Comments on the Westwood Square options are welcomed. Please comment on the website or email revitalizewestwood @ gmail.com.

Presentation, Westwood Square June 12 2014

Westwood Square June 12 Community Meeting

 

 

Square, triangle, rectangle, circle — we won’t know the final shape or size until a couple of things happen.  First, the Westwood Coalition invites you to a community meeting on Thursday, June 12, 2014 at 7:00 p.m. in Westwood School’s auditorium (2981 Montana Avenue, at Harrison & Montana – enter on the side facing Westwood First Presbyterian Church).  We will review the criteria for the Square (or triangle or circle…), already identified through neighborhood design charrettes and community meetings over the past few years, and then look at and provide input on several iterations of the Square as part of Cincinnati Department of Transportation & Engineering’s feasibility study.  Attendees will consider the criteria and apply them to each of the draft versions, providing comments and asking questions.  See you on June 12!  There is limited parking on site, with more parking on surrounding streets and Metro bus service.

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April 16 Community Meeting

The Coalition invites you to a community meeting on Wednesday, April 16, 2014 at 7:00 p.m. at Westwood Town Hall Hold the date! We will provide a quick update on developments like the Westwood Square feasibility study and the Mayor’s support for revitalization. Then we’ll launch right into a look at the current state of the historic business district and the conditions necessary for vitality and development. With presenters Elizabeth Bartley (School of Planning, University of Cincinnati) and Kathleen Norris (managing principal, Urban Fast Forward), we’ll look at the historic business district’s current and potential community and economic activity, the importance of place, the promise of public-private partnerships, and moving from here to there.

See you on April 16th.

Council 7-2 Vote for Westwood NBD Form-Based Code

At the Cincinnati City Council meeting today, council members votes 7-2 to favor of the Westwood application of the Cincinnati form-based code. Voting for the recommendation: Council members Seelbach, Simpson, Sittenfeld, Winburn, Young, Murray, and Mann. And voting against: Council members Smitherman and Flynn. The form-based code application in Westwood’s historic neighborhood business district (NBD) will go into effect in thirty days.

Seven Westwood residents spoke in support of the form-based code, citing thorough research, community engagement, protections provided to single family housing, alignment with the strategic plan, and more. Joining in the public comment period was Caleb Faux, of the Planning Commission. He commented that dissent in Westwood is essentially a misunderstanding; the form-based code remedies the concerns about current zoning voiced by some of these concerned citizens.

Although two council members expressed negative impressions of aspects of the form-based code itself, council members were unified in their remarks on overwhelming community support, transformational change in Westwood, and a commitment to partner with the community to bring development and investment to Westwood’s historic business district. Mr. Seelbach commented on room for disagreement in public discourse, but he condemned divisiveness and unproductive behaviors, as did several other council members. Ms. Murray, Mr. Sittenfeld, and Mr. Winburn all remarked on their respect for the community’s exhaustive research and engagement, the value of the Coalition, and council members’deference to the neighborhood. Mr. Mann noted that the form-based code includes use restrictions, remarking that it’s inaccurate to say that the code does not regulate for use. Ms. Murray spoke of her community council experience, commenting that the cooperative nature of the Coalition is noteworthy and should be ongoing. Mr. Young pointed out that, while the form-based code is new to Cincinnati, it works well in other cities.

In discussion before the vote, Mayor Cranley voiced his strong support for the Westwood Coalition and the public process in Westwood around the revitalization efforts. He commented positively on the proposed Westwood Square project and said that he intends to help to make it happen, including a proposed ordinance for financial support for Madcap Puppets as an anchor organization on the Westwood Square. Mayor Cranley noted that it takes money to revitalize, including both private and public funding. He identified perceived shortcomings of use restrictions in the code and concerns about acceptance of the code by the local development community, but the bulk of the Mayor’s comments celebrated the Coalition-led process and the collaboration and vision demonstrated in Westwood. Mr. Cranley urged continued work by the Westwood Coalition and applauded the commitment of WestCURC on the business district. Mr. Winburn pledged his support as chair of the Budget Committee to stand with the community and support the Mayor in identifying economic development support for Westwood’s historic NBD.

Mr. Cranley announced his intention to hold a press conference in Westwood next week to underscore his support for the revitalization of the historic NBD, Mapcap Puppets, and development of a Westwood Square.

Up next: the Westwood Square feasibility study and consideration of specifics of economic development.

Total Land Area for Form-Based Code in Westwood

Did you know that the proposed application of Cincinnati’s Form-Based Code in Westwood is just 105 acres, or only 2.7% of the total land area in Westwood?  Because the Westwood Coalition recommended an incremental approach to focus the application intentionally on Westwood’s historic business district (Westwood historic Main Street and focal point), without diluting the effort across a large area, Westwood’s application of the FBC would be the smallest area of the first four neighborhoods, as compared to 187 acres in Walnut Hills, 155 acres in College Hill, and 150 acres in Madisonville.  Each neighborhood is indicating its preference based on neighborhood priorities and desire; in Westwood, we’re keeping it tight, focused, and achievable.